A-Z Reuse and Recycling

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

Paint Tins

Environmental Issues

Paint contains chemicals such as solvents and metals that can contaminate our groundwater and endanger human health.

Disposal Method

Empty or full, take your paint tins for free drop off at:


 

Paper

Environmental Issues

When paper is disposed of in landfill rather than recycled, it creates methane as it breaks down. Methane is a greenhouse gas 21 times more harmful than carbon dioxide. Manufacturing recycled paper can use up to 90% less water and 50% less energy than making it from trees.

Disposal Method

Recycle your magazines, paper, newspapers and phone books in your household recycling bin. All paper bigger than an envelope can be put in the recycling bin. For smaller pieces/shredded paper you can place it in a paper bag so it doesn't end in waste. For larger amounts that may not fit into the recycling bin drop them off for free at:


Paper Towels, Tissues and Napkins

Environmental Issues

When paper is disposed of in landfill rather than recycled, it creates methane as it breaks down. Methane is a greenhouse gas 21 times more harmful than carbon dioxide. Manufacturing recycled paper can use up to 90% less water and 50% less energy than making it from trees.

Disposal Method

Add your paper towels, tissues and napkins to your compost or wormfarm.


Pizza Boxes

Environmental Issues

When paper and cardboard is disposed of in landfill rather than recycled, it creates methane as it breaks down. Methane is a greenhouse gas 21 times more harmful than carbon dioxide. Manufacturing recycled paper can use up to 90% less water and 50% less energy than making it from trees.

Disposal Method

In your household recycling service, add it to your compost or wormfarm, or for free at:


 

Plastic Bags

Environmental Issues

Avoid the plastic bag waste problem by using reusable and biodegradable bags. Plastic bags are not recyclable in your household recycle bin. Take them to your supermarket and place them in their special 'plastic bag recycling bins'.

Disposal Method

Recycle plastic bags for free at:

  • Bi-Lo, Coles, Franklins & Woolworths

Plastic Garden Pots

Environmental Issues

Plastic Garden Pots are made from polypropylene, a plastic that can be completely recycled and used to make new pots. Plastic Garden Pots are however not recyclable in your household recycling bin.

Disposal Method

Take your unwanted Plastic Garden Pots and trays for free recycling to:

  • Hawkesbury Community Nursery – Wednesdays 9.00am - 12 noon.  10 Mulgrave Road, Mulgrave - Phone: (02) 4560 4525
  • Garden City Plastics – Place in the large green cage Monday – Friday between 7.00am - 5.00pm.  344 Annangrove Road, Rouse Hill - Phone: (02) 9679 1173

Polystyrene Foam (Expanded Polystyrene Foam)

Environmental Issues

Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) is a lightweight, rigid cellular plastic that is used widely as a packaging medium. Its shock absorbing characteristics lend it to uses as storage and transport of fragile and expensive items such as electronic equipment, chemicals and wines. Polystyrene is a type of plastic and is therefore derived from a oil, a non-renewable resource. EPS is not recyclable through household recycling bins, even if it’s marked with the plastics identification code 6 or 7. For more information see the Expanded Polystyrene website.

Recycle Method

Some Polystyrene foam products can be recycled at Expanded Polystyrene Collection Centres.


 

Printer Cartridges – Laser and Ink

Environmental Issues

When printer cartridges break apart in landfill, they have the potential to contaminate groundwater and the environment. Cartridges are recycled into new products such as bench seats and rulers

Recycle Method

Drop off any type of toner or ink cartridge from a fax, photocopier or printer at:

  • Hawkesbury City Council - 366 George Street, Windsor
  • And participating stores Australia Post, Harvey Norman, Tandy, JB Hi-Fi, Dick Smith Electronics, The Good Guys and Officeworks

HOUSEHOLD QUANTITIES ONLY. Businesses are encouraged to set up their own free recycling service for this material.
For more information, contact the Waste Education Officer on (02) 4560 4444.



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