Volunteers wanted for new Windsor Bushcare Group

Windsor residents now have the chance to form a new Bushcare Group, thanks to Bushcare volunteer John Jose, who is asking for people to join him.

John has been single-handedly planting, weeding and restoring the riverbank around the Windsor Wharf Reserve area next to Windsor Bridge, Windsor for the past three years.

Bushcare volunteer John Jose and Council’s Community Bushcare Officer, Martin Gauci at Windsor Wharf Reserve area

Unfortunately, the vegetation he is planting along the riverbanks is regularly being dug up, possibly because people are searching for worms as fishing bait. The exposed riverbank leaves the area susceptible to erosion and weeds.

Ironically, native vegetation growing along riverbanks is proven to encourage higher fish populations in rivers. When people dig up the riverbank plants, the soil becomes exposed and can run into the river when it rains, creating murky water with very little oxygen, making it difficult for fish to flourish.

John would truly welcome a helping hand along the riverbank at Windsor Wharf to restore such a historic riverbank and for people to take ownership of this great location. To volunteer and help John restore this part of the riverbank, please contact Council’s Community Bushcare Officer, Martin Gauci on (02) 4560 4525 or email mgauci@hawkesbury.nsw.gov.au

Did you know?

  • Turbidity is a measure of water clarity or murkiness.
  • Excessive levels of suspended solids in water causes high turbidity. This can reduce aquatic plant growth due to lack of light, or completely smother plants as the sediment settles. Aquatic animals can die when there are few or no plants to eat or if their gills are blocked by dirt.
  • Suspended solids can make it difficult for animals to breathe by clogging or damaging their gills, or making it difficult for animals that filter-feed to collect food. As the suspended particles settle to the bottom they can also smother animal habitats, eggs and larvae.
  • Turbid water also heats up more than clear water, which can reduce the amount of dissolved oxygen available for aquatic animals to breathe. Over time, unnatural levels of turbidity can reduce the biodiversity in a waterway. Click here for more information

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