2010

2010

Interpreting portraits - Macquarie 1810-2010

Interpreting portraits — Macquarie 1810-2010

The centerpiece of this exhibition is what is believed to be a portrait of Macquarie painted by Colvin Smith.  It has become an icon in Windsor, where it graced the courthouse for many years. But was Smith really the painter and was it really a painting of Macquarie? Some locals have gone to great lengths to prove the point, but still a question remains and it doesn’t just refer to this particular painting: To what extent is any portrait a true and accurate depiction of its subject? The 200th anniversary of Macquarie’s coming to New South Wales – and the Hawkesbury – provides an opportunity to view a number of nineteenth century portraits of Macquarie and his contemporaries, including the Macarthurs, Matthew Flinders and Mrs Blaxland. Portraits will also be created through primary source material from the Museum and private collections. A small number of artists will be asked to respond to Macquarie and the notion of portraiture working directly on the gallery walls and within the space.

A Hawkesbury Regional gallery exhibition, officially endorsed as part of the NSW Government’s Macquarie 2010 Bicentenary Commemorations.

Public Programs

Windsor Courthouse - Portrait of Governor Lachlan Macquarie

Unknown (Colvin Smith, attrib) Lachlan Macquarie, Governor of NSW 1910-1821 c.1820s oil on canvas 93 X 67cm courtesy NSW Department of Justice & Attorney General

MOMENTUM: 18th Tamworth Fibre Textile Biennial

Showcasing the finest and most exploratory aspects of contemporary fibre textile practice, Momentum is a Tamworth Regional gallery Exhibition, curated by Valerie Kirk, the Head of Textiles at the Australian National University in Canberra.

Artists: Christine Atkins, Babbarra Designs, Jane Bowden, Alana Clifton-Cunningham, Annabelle Collett, Fiona Gavino, Robyn Glade-Wright, Hilary Green, Mandy Gunn, Cecilia Heffer, Melissa Hirsch, Liz Jeneid, Jill Kinnear, Kelly Leonard, Rodney Love, Penny Malone, Elisa Markes-Young, Lucille Martin, Vicki Mason, Ainslie Murray, Debra Porch, Louise Saxton, Demelza Sherwood, Annie Trevillian, Elefteria Vlavianos

This exhibition is supported by Visions of Australia, an Australian Government program supporting touring exhibitions by providing funding assistance for the development and touring of Australian cultural material across Australia

Momentum Acknowledgements

Public Programs

Louise Saxton re-collection: specimens 1– 67, 2007 – 08 Cotton and linen embroidery, cotton thread, silk; steel and glass-headed embroidery pins, nylon bridal tulle, wooden rod. 30cm x 24cm Photo Andrew Wuttke

Louise Saxton re-collection: specimens 1– 67, 2007 – 08 Cotton and linen embroidery, cotton thread, silk; steel and glass-headed embroidery pins, nylon bridal tulle, wooden rod. 30cm x 24cm Photo Andrew Wuttke

Charles and Ashley Cooper

Charles Cooper has shown extensively within Australia and abroad over the last 30 years, following in the footsteps of his grandfather, who captured with pencil and paper many of Sydney’s most beautiful historical buildings. Upon retirement, he and his wife, Caryl, retired to Lower Portland and the Colo River that they loved. He was also the founding president of the Macquarie Towns Art Society.

Public Programs

Dr Lycia Trouton essay

 

Charles Cooper, Snake Track (Hawkesbury) 1986. oil on canvas 92cm x 122cm

Charles Cooper, Snake Track (Hawkesbury) 1986. oil on canvas 92cm x 122cm

Still

The still life has its origins in ancient times, but it wasn’t until the 17th century that it became a popular form of artistic expression. Today, still life continues to be a source of aesthetic inspiration, and while the term often summons up ideas of tradition, the still life we encounter in the gallery may be something completely unexpected. In this exhibition we look at the ways in which artists create still life in the 21st century, and compare contemporary practice with that of previous generations.

Sam Leach Fish - Still

Sam Leach, Goltzius Whale, 2007 oil on linen 75 x 135cm

Pubilc Programs

 

Replant: a new generation of botanical art.

In this touring exhibition from Artback NT, six artists from very different backgrounds explore the scientific, cultural and social aspects of indigenous plant species of Australia’s far north. There will also be a separate, complementary exhibition of work by Kurrajong botanical artist, Elaine Musgrave, who has been commissioned to paint the Governor Macquarie rose, specially bred in the Hawkesbury to commemorate Macquarie’s arrival in the colony 200 years ago. And, Bette Mifsud, who has been exhibiting large-scale photo-media works, installations and portraiture in Australia and overseas since 1985.

Public Programs

Fiona Hall, Green ants nest 2006, etching 33 x 24.5 cm Courtesy Nomad Art Productions

Fiona Hall, Green ants nest 2006, etching 33 x 24.5 cm Courtesy Nomad Art Productions

Page ID 16433

Page ID: 16433